Question!

How effective are fly traps around the barn?


Well, in a nutshell they are awesome.  I have never hung a flytrap and had it remain empty for long.  Downside is the smell, and they are not so appealing to look at.  But - fly control at the horse barn is a multi pronged approach - you need to attack all stages of the fly life cycle.  So you have attacked the source of fly food and egg laying goodness (manure) and provided your horses with a breeze (nature made or fan based!)  But you still have flies.  So time to work on getting rid of the adults flying around.  

 4.jpg

A sticky trap version of things. 

 

You can buy fly traps, or you can try your hand at making your own.  It’s easy - you only need a few things.  A container, some bait (AKA really stinky stuff) and also a place to hang it.  Away from the people.  A location far away does a few things - keeps the stink from the bait away, and lures the flies away from the horses and you.  

 7.jpg

40,000 flies is a lot of flies.  A LOT. 

 

What you need to make a bottle type fly trap:

-A two liter bottle.  You can also make smaller traps with smaller plastic beverage bottles, but then you may just be making more of them more often.  

-Some bait.  This is what lures your flies to their doom.  (Insert ominous music here and also maybe some diabolical laughter).  You have a few choices

  • Decaying fruits and veggies.
  • Manure of some sort.  Horse, dog, cat.  It may not be effective when dried out.
  • A sugar water solution.  Add vinegar or not, your choice.  

 1.jpg

A craft so simple even I can do it. 

 

It’s that simple.  The how-to of making your trap:

 

-Cut your bottle so that you can separate the top from the bottom, about 1/3 of the way down.  

-Fill the bottom with your fly bait of choice. 

-Put the top into the bottom upside down and secure with tape.  

-Hang your trap! 

 

2.jpg

I used old fruit as bait an a bit of string to hang this bad boy.

 

Do you use fly traps around the barn?  Why or why not?